Dan Gilmour gets it right

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Dan Gilmour gets it right again. There are two articles on this page about Patents and the DNS system, both of which make considerable sense. If people have patents, they can only use open-source if they license their patents as well. If they don’t, they must pay. Neato.I’m looking into the power of controlled group discussions and review – this article discusses part of the issue. Consumers are cleverer than any individual reviewer.

And there’s more: “Now we’re

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And there’s more: “Now we’re getting a demo of the “natural interface elements.” Smart tags. Your emailer recognized company and people names. Click on a smart link and get a popup menu that gets you to their website and other places.”From Dave Winer’s review of the new Windows: Scripting News”Storage is out in the cloud. The cloud understands, it’s richer, it indexes things, it’s based on database technology, it’s the XML store. “. So I appear to be on the right track then…Wicked spoofs of Hollywood trailers at Trailervision. I particularly like MP3 (Mission Possible 3) and Porquoi (a French film.

Don’t read this without a

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Don’t read this without a cold shower nearby. It’s about the future of the computer and why they’re rubbish right now. Mindf**k.If you can possibly be interested in how to speed up the loading time of a website, here’s a good article.The Limits of Copyright talks about how far we can go.Fortune article about the hot new idea of the year. That’s Napster / Gnutella, FYI.InfraSearch is a new type of search engine built on Gnutella technology. It’s interesting, very interesting. Question is: what will they charge?A useful comparison between Frontier / Zope and StoryServer. “Take away the workflow support, and StoryServer is just a big TCL interpreter with a focus on the Web. The rest of it is a fairly sophisticated caching system.” So why is it so expensive?!Stephen Pinker is one of my heroes. Read his viewpoint on what effect the information revolution will have.From the samearticle: “The company, which offers software that lets consumers build Web pages, raised $70 million in a secondary stock offering in May 1999 after boasting on the cover of its stock prospectus that it had 10.2 million users. But the figure, attributed to market researcher DoubleClick, was more than triple the 3.2 million visitors logged by Media Metrix. Theglobe.com quietly recanted its statement a month later. DoubleClick blamed the miscalculation on human error and faults Theglobe.com for using the data in a securities document without permission. Theglobe.com declined to comment.” Some people I know will find this funny!Who believes in website visitor figures anyway? This is an interesting article in USA Today (bizarrely) that discusses the issue.

“‘For example, in a focus

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“‘For example, in a focus group, you holdup an interface. One guy says he’s not sure if he likes it. People are influenced by this comment. Behind the scenes, everyone runs around changing things. I trust behavior more. It’s a stronger indicator of whether an interface is effective or not.’”. Good quote from a good article.A great follow up to the Courtney Love article. the problem with music.

A new phrase “B2Me” is

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A new phrase “B2Me” is described here: “Our goal is if we have 20 million customers, we should have 20 million stores”.Now that’s what I call an exchange! Transora. But what a terrible name. Reminds me of TransNora – a totally different entity (Last of the summer wine?).I was tempted to frame my first check from AllAdvantage (it was written in favour of “Lockout”). However, it seems that the obviously stupid nature of the scheme is coming home to rest. Check the FORTUNE.com article.

A friend of a friend used to work for Firefly, who had a similar infomediary plan. They ended up being privacy specialists rather than selling their database and information. Just goes to show, hey?An interview with Neal Stephenson author of Cryptonomicon, one of my favourite books.Everyone should read this article about the recording industry in the US. Salon.com tech | Courtney Love does the math. I’m sure it’s the same in the UK.

A list of IXL white

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A list of IXL white papers. The one on COPE is particularly interesting. iXL: White PapersThis is a useful summary of how the various browsers deal with styles. Not very well?A lot of the tweeds that we sell to at Datamonitor love search more than anything else. A well-argued case for this not being sensible. They mention Jared Spool again.The last page of this Standard article discussing eContent has an interesting quote:“The business model that would be interesting is a digital content incubator,” he says. “They should behave like a large studio and could generate enough aggregate cash to have a story to tell.”Sounds like “Datamonitor”!Will big brother back down? TUK’s RIP bill discussed by the BBC.This is an interesting article about the organizations that control the internet.An interesting point: if you keep the same grid structure on a site, people will start ignoring entire areas of your site. Read the details here. But surely this is really nasty for the user. I wonder what Neilsen says?I think that this is a really great idea. You can use standard SLR and / or digital film to take your shots. It does some odd stuff with the viewfinder, etc, but I guess you’d get used to it.A good list of b2b exchanges. The only IP-related one is a patent and license exchangeYou couldn’t ask for better. Wanna find out who went to the wall today in internet-space? Check out the main event.

Yah boo sucks. The Offspring

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Yah boo sucks. The Offspring obviously have a sense of humour. THE REGISTER: Napster to sue bastard Offspring. Pure Class!THE REGISTER: C-R-A-P.Com takes the B-I-S-C-U-I-T. Need I say more?So, according to The Register, Microsoft’s plan is to let the Windows OS stuff gradually die a death, and make a hybrid application / browser / management company the newly dominant force on the Net / other devices. Hmmm.Even the New York Times picked this one up! Rebel Outpost on the Fringes of Cyberspace.This is amazingly similar to Neal Stephenson’s cryptonomicon. A regulation-free data haven in the North Sea. Check it outat Wired. Life imitates art!